Mind. Good Health. Happiness.

Share

Self-esteem.

Health

Health. Emotion.

Emotional fitness is an important part of good health. What goes into your mind is an important as what goes into your body. Even if your physical body is healthy, if you’re imbalanced emotionally, your self-esteem can be affected. Therefore, investing in the care and feeding of your mind is a critical step to good health.

One consequence of not taking care of your mind is depression, a buildup of unaddressed, unacknowledged, and unheard, unappreciated, alone, as if you lack control over your life, ill-equipped to handle life on its own terms – these are conditions that often drive us to depression. And some of the symptoms are not eating, overrating, isolating, or resuming an old destructive habit, such as smoking, drinking, or gambling. At some time or another we all face problems – financial, personal, family, health, spiritual – and must deal with the realities of depression. How we handle depression and how long we remain in it are determined by our willingness to take certain actions.

While it would be easy to say all depression can be remedied with one solution, that’s not true. However, the following suggestions have worked for me and countless others, and may work for you too. However, if you are severely depressed and have had suicidal thoughts, please contact a health care professional.

  • Take Action: For many people, action is the key to alleviating or eliminating depression.
  • Be Patient: It’s normal to want instantaneously results after you’ve taken an action. But in truth, results rarely happen immediately.
  • Enlist A Friend: Having someone to talk to about your feelings is important.
  • Read Daily Mediations: Consider beginning each day with selected readings from positive, uplifting books.
  • Spend Quiet Time Alone: By allowing daily quiet time you create a balance between the doing and the being aspect of your life.

What can you do right now, this moment, to move your closer to better health? Perhaps getting a physical exam or just making an appointment with a doctor, or quitting smoking or drinking?  Eating a green salad, buying a quart bottle of water and drinking it all, making a spa appointment, going for a brisk walk outside or on the treadmill?

Feel free to join my conversation on FacebookFacebook Esteemableacts Fan Page, or my Facebook Law Page, you can also interact with me on my Twitter Esteemable Acts page, Twitter Law Page, or on LinkedIn.

You are in a relationship with your body

Share

Health. Healthy Living. Research. Body.

Relationships work best when we respect one another, and respect is an action. Listening to your body when it says its needs something and giving it what it asks for – such as rest and relaxation when it’s tired, water when it’s thirsty, nutritious food when it’s hungry and pampering all the time – are behaviors that demonstrate respect. It’s not enough to say you love your body, and then abuse it. Forcing yourself to stay awake past your body’s bedtime is not a respectful act, particularly if it’s done on a regular basis. Stuff yourself with more food when your body says “I’ve had enough” is not a good thing either.

The relationship between you and your body will improve when you take responsibility for your actions. It’s easy to use your past or your environment or even your feelings as excuses for not taking care of yourself, but to have and maintain good health, you must take responsibility for what you have  done and continue to do to your body. What excuses are you making? Who are you blaming for the condition your body is in? How can you start taking responsibility now?

Taking responsibility begins with gathering information. Read up on health matters in your favorite magazine. Most have a column or a regular department addressing health issues. Go to the library, look on the Internet, and ask questions of health care professionals. Gather information about your body. When was the last time you had a regular physical? Do you know what’s going on with your body? Are you confused about which medical exams/screenings you should have and when? While identifying which exams you need can be overwhelming and frightening, it’s worth the effort. Ask your doctor which tests are appropriate for someone of your gender, race, and age. There may even be specific tests given to people who live in certain geographical regions. Look into it.

Another step in the process of self-care is being proactive, that is, taking positive action before there is a problem. The opposite of proactive is reactive, when you wait until your body, in desperation, cries out for help. And sometimes you wait until great damage is already done.

Thus, the more you know, the more you can help yourself. The Internet is a wonderful resource. This is an important step in taking care of your health. Here is a short alphabetical list of screenings you might want to consider: AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, blood pressure, bone density, breast exam, cholesterol, fecal occult blood test, glucose, hearing, mammogram, PAP smear, problem-drinking assessment, prostate-specific antigen test, thyroid-stimulating hormone measurement, and vision. Find out which ones you need, and take them.

Don’t wait and see.

Find out now. If there is a problem that needs to be addressed, take care of it immediately. Don’t wait until it’s too late.

Feel free to join my conversation on FacebookFacebook Esteemableacts Fan Page, or my Facebook Law Page, you can also interact with me on my Twitter Esteemable Acts page, Twitter Law Page, or on LinkedIn.

Emotional Fitness

Share

Good Health.

Good health. Yoga woman relaxing by seaEmotional fitness is an important part of good health. What goes into your mind is an important as what goes into your body. Even if your physical body is healthy, if you’re imbalanced emotionally, your self-esteem can be affected. Therefore, investing in the care and feeding of your mind is a critical step to good health.

Taking Care of the Mind.

One consequence of not taking care of your mind is depression, a buildup of unaddressed, unacknowledged, and unheard, unappreciated, alone, as if you lack control over your life, ill-equipped to handle life on its own terms – these are conditions that often drive us to depression. And some of the symptoms are not eating, overrating, isolating, or resuming an old destructive habit, such as smoking, drinking, or gambling. At some time or another we all face problems – financial, personal, family, health, spiritual – and must deal with the realities of depression. How we handle depression and how long we remain in it are determined by our willingness to take certain actions.

While it would be easy to say all depression can be remedied with one solution, that’s not true. However, the following suggestions have worked for me and countless others, and may work for you too. However, if you are severely depressed and have had suicidal thoughts, please contact a health care professional.

  • Take Action: For many people, action is the key to alleviating or eliminating depression.
  • Be Patient: It’s normal to want instantaneously results after you’ve taken an action. But in truth, results rarely happen immediately.
  • Enlist A Friend: Having someone to talk to about your feelings is important.
  • Read Daily Mediations: Consider beginning each day with selected readings from positive, uplifting books.
  • Spend Quiet Time Alone: By allowing daily quiet time you create a balance between the doing and the being aspect of your life.

What can you do right now, this moment, to move your closer to better health? Perhaps getting a physical exam or just making an appointment with a doctor, or quitting smoking or drinking?  Eating a green salad, buying a quart bottle of water and drinking it all, making a spa appointment, going for a brisk walk outside or on the treadmill?

Feel free to join my conversation on FacebookFacebook Esteemableacts Fan Page, or my Facebook Law Page, you can also interact with me on my Twitter Esteemable Acts page, Twitter Law Page, or on LinkedIn.